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Blogs We Like: Birdie Houdini
Ink is inherently weird. It courses through our daily life, taken for granted and ingrained in banal transactions and communications. The right artist, though, can foreground its teeming, abyssal infinity, and elevate it to an otherworldly, intimidating, and fertile substance—a kind of positively charged void. Birdie is one of those brilliant few who not only tap into but manifest that undulating fluidity.
Given that phenomenology of ink, then, it’s no surprise that Birdie cites Heronymous Bosch as a major influence. Bosch’s obsessively full and unrestrained painting served as a dark reflection of religious fantasy in his time, and while Birdie’s work isn’t nearly as overtly theological, there’s a similar sense of the portal door being completely blown open. And while her illustration maintains a similar level of disinhibition, Birdie’s choice of black and white ink (compared to Bosch’s oil paint) is a kind of Lovecraftian augmentation, an anchoring of the imaginary in a much more speculative and nocturnal (lunar, even?) universe.
Birdie’s recent Altarpiece triptych is probably the best starting place for untangling her sea of concepts, shapes, references, and entities. Each piece is an esoteric plot, a floating vision of elemental calculus and symbolic poetry, constructing a subtle narrative with a wholly unique and introspective language. And it’s not only entertaining, but deeply, primordially moving too.
You can find Birdie on Facebook and Behance too.
Zoom Info
Blogs We Like: Birdie Houdini
Ink is inherently weird. It courses through our daily life, taken for granted and ingrained in banal transactions and communications. The right artist, though, can foreground its teeming, abyssal infinity, and elevate it to an otherworldly, intimidating, and fertile substance—a kind of positively charged void. Birdie is one of those brilliant few who not only tap into but manifest that undulating fluidity.
Given that phenomenology of ink, then, it’s no surprise that Birdie cites Heronymous Bosch as a major influence. Bosch’s obsessively full and unrestrained painting served as a dark reflection of religious fantasy in his time, and while Birdie’s work isn’t nearly as overtly theological, there’s a similar sense of the portal door being completely blown open. And while her illustration maintains a similar level of disinhibition, Birdie’s choice of black and white ink (compared to Bosch’s oil paint) is a kind of Lovecraftian augmentation, an anchoring of the imaginary in a much more speculative and nocturnal (lunar, even?) universe.
Birdie’s recent Altarpiece triptych is probably the best starting place for untangling her sea of concepts, shapes, references, and entities. Each piece is an esoteric plot, a floating vision of elemental calculus and symbolic poetry, constructing a subtle narrative with a wholly unique and introspective language. And it’s not only entertaining, but deeply, primordially moving too.
You can find Birdie on Facebook and Behance too.
Zoom Info
Blogs We Like: Birdie Houdini
Ink is inherently weird. It courses through our daily life, taken for granted and ingrained in banal transactions and communications. The right artist, though, can foreground its teeming, abyssal infinity, and elevate it to an otherworldly, intimidating, and fertile substance—a kind of positively charged void. Birdie is one of those brilliant few who not only tap into but manifest that undulating fluidity.
Given that phenomenology of ink, then, it’s no surprise that Birdie cites Heronymous Bosch as a major influence. Bosch’s obsessively full and unrestrained painting served as a dark reflection of religious fantasy in his time, and while Birdie’s work isn’t nearly as overtly theological, there’s a similar sense of the portal door being completely blown open. And while her illustration maintains a similar level of disinhibition, Birdie’s choice of black and white ink (compared to Bosch’s oil paint) is a kind of Lovecraftian augmentation, an anchoring of the imaginary in a much more speculative and nocturnal (lunar, even?) universe.
Birdie’s recent Altarpiece triptych is probably the best starting place for untangling her sea of concepts, shapes, references, and entities. Each piece is an esoteric plot, a floating vision of elemental calculus and symbolic poetry, constructing a subtle narrative with a wholly unique and introspective language. And it’s not only entertaining, but deeply, primordially moving too.
You can find Birdie on Facebook and Behance too.
Zoom Info
Blogs We Like: Birdie Houdini
Ink is inherently weird. It courses through our daily life, taken for granted and ingrained in banal transactions and communications. The right artist, though, can foreground its teeming, abyssal infinity, and elevate it to an otherworldly, intimidating, and fertile substance—a kind of positively charged void. Birdie is one of those brilliant few who not only tap into but manifest that undulating fluidity.
Given that phenomenology of ink, then, it’s no surprise that Birdie cites Heronymous Bosch as a major influence. Bosch’s obsessively full and unrestrained painting served as a dark reflection of religious fantasy in his time, and while Birdie’s work isn’t nearly as overtly theological, there’s a similar sense of the portal door being completely blown open. And while her illustration maintains a similar level of disinhibition, Birdie’s choice of black and white ink (compared to Bosch’s oil paint) is a kind of Lovecraftian augmentation, an anchoring of the imaginary in a much more speculative and nocturnal (lunar, even?) universe.
Birdie’s recent Altarpiece triptych is probably the best starting place for untangling her sea of concepts, shapes, references, and entities. Each piece is an esoteric plot, a floating vision of elemental calculus and symbolic poetry, constructing a subtle narrative with a wholly unique and introspective language. And it’s not only entertaining, but deeply, primordially moving too.
You can find Birdie on Facebook and Behance too.
Zoom Info

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Blogs We Like: Birdie Houdini

Ink is inherently weird. It courses through our daily life, taken for granted and ingrained in banal transactions and communications. The right artist, though, can foreground its teeming, abyssal infinity, and elevate it to an otherworldly, intimidating, and fertile substance—a kind of positively charged void. Birdie is one of those brilliant few who not only tap into but manifest that undulating fluidity.

Given that phenomenology of ink, then, it’s no surprise that Birdie cites Heronymous Bosch as a major influence. Bosch’s obsessively full and unrestrained painting served as a dark reflection of religious fantasy in his time, and while Birdie’s work isn’t nearly as overtly theological, there’s a similar sense of the portal door being completely blown open. And while her illustration maintains a similar level of disinhibition, Birdie’s choice of black and white ink (compared to Bosch’s oil paint) is a kind of Lovecraftian augmentation, an anchoring of the imaginary in a much more speculative and nocturnal (lunar, even?) universe.

Birdie’s recent Altarpiece triptych is probably the best starting place for untangling her sea of concepts, shapes, references, and entities. Each piece is an esoteric plot, a floating vision of elemental calculus and symbolic poetry, constructing a subtle narrative with a wholly unique and introspective language. And it’s not only entertaining, but deeply, primordially moving too.

You can find Birdie on Facebook and Behance too.

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